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Mirror Image

by admin

Mirror Image
This activity involves people in pairs, with one person mirroring the actions and movements of the other person.
Body movement exercises can be most revealing, confronting and rewarding. “Human sculpting via mirroring” brings body movement exploration into the dyad. By reflecting body movements of another, several subtle but complex processes are activated, heightening self- and other-awareness. Immediate non-verbal feedback exercises in the right time and place have the potential to be transformational. Other times this can simply be a fun loosen-upper.
Works with any size group; split into pairs/couples.
Although it is simple, the activity can be confronting and requires experienced leadership and a well chosen moment/sequence/program.
Usually, make sure the social ice is well and truly broken, and that there have been other body movement and physical warmup/stretching exercises, with some laughter and some seriousness.
Offer a demonstration. Invite a volunteer to stand facing you about half a meter apart. The instructor initiates action, with the other person following in “mirror image”.
Make your movements engaging and slow enough for the other person to mime as if they were a full-length mirror.
Also include zany stretches/contortions to get a few laughs, especially facial gymnastics. Include action sequences for tasks like brushing your teeth. The demonstration helps to loosen up conceptions and inhibitions.
In pairs, one person stretches, the other follows. Then swap after some time.
Debrief as you see fit.

Notes
Variation: Reverse-mirror image. Try following partner’s movements in reverse-mirror image (i.e., swap left <-> right)
The exercise can be done in different ways to emphasize difference aspects, e.g., for trust-building, drama warmup, ice breaker, etc.
Related Activities
Finger Dancing
Kirtans (calling – response chanting)
Walking in Sync

Equipment

  • No equipment needed, just a place where people can spread out.

Time

  • Total ~ 10-15 minutes.

Brief description

  • Involves people in pairs, with one person mirroring the actions of the other.  Stimulates self- and other-awareness.

Acknowledgements

My homework for a creative leadership class

by admin

This painting I created as a final project for my favorite Masters Class in Creative Leadership and Problem Solving: I use symbols to describe my leadership style. I went all out abstract! This explanation comes with it.

This painting is using symbolism for theories and how I combine visionary leadership, with Flow, Divergent thinking, and Foresight.
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To begin with, the Foresight Preferences to show that I am a leader that want to help my followers find out who they are and how to use their skills to the best of their ability.
Those are the four symbols with myself in the middle. Classifier, Indicator, (Leader) Developer, and the Implementer

The symbolical thought bubble which we all share is my “Vision.”
I would like to think of myself as a visionary leader with a visionary thinking style in.


The image is also showing that not only am I sharing my vision with the followers but I am fostering them to feel as if they are a part of the Vision.
If they feel they have a role in achieving the vision, this will help foster an environment for “Flow.”

The culture of the staff is based on flow as the reward and goal. That is the intertwined energy sources “Flowing.” The environment would need to be able to support the Flow environment.

Our culture is to make working fun and creative, this will drive you, motivation and skill being stretched in a supportive environment is the recipe for success, and this is accomplished with the use of divergent and convergent problem-solving.

The two circles with the smaller colored waves is a visualization for Divergent thinking and the collection of mass ideas and filtering through the Convergent circle to get to the most Novel solution.

Creating flow through employees knowing their skills and stretching them to achieve more of the feeling of flow and achievement.

Mindsets by Carol Dweck

Mindsets by Carol Dweck –Changed my life the book I ever read (listened to)

How many people feel that some people are born with a talent and that talent makes them different?
How many people feel that passion and effort can be someone’s success stories?

Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck in decades of research on achievement and success discovered a simple idea that makes all the difference. Your “Mindset”

There are 2 minds sets out there a Fixed or Talent mindset and a Growth mindset, We are going to learn to identify both of them so you can utilize them.

In a fixed mindset, people believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are simply fixed traits. They spend their time documenting their intelligence or talent instead of developing them. They also believe that talent alone creates success—without effort. They’re wrong.

In a growth mindset, people believe that their most basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work—brains and talent are just the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment. Virtually all great people have had these qualities.

Here are some simple steps to get the idea and to start to make your mindset work for you.

Step1. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice.”
As you approach a challenge, that voice might say to you
“Are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don’t have the talent.”
“What if you fail—you’ll be a failure”
“People will laugh at you for thinking you had talent.”
“If you don’t try, you can protect yourself and keep your dignity.”

As you hit a setback, the voice might say,
“This would have been a snap if you really had talent.”
“You see, I told you it was a risk. Now you’ve gone and shown the world how limited you are.”
“It’s not too late to back out, make excuses, and try to regain your dignity.”

As you face criticism, you might hear yourself say,
“It’s not my fault. It was something or someone else’s fault.”
You might feel yourself getting angry at the person who is giving you feedback.
“Who do they think they are? I’ll put them in their place.”
The other person might be giving you specific, constructive feedback, but you might be hearing them say “I’m really disappointed in you. I thought you were capable but now I see you’re not.”

 Step 2. Recognize that you have a choice.
How you interpret challenges, setbacks, and criticism is your choice. You can interpret them in a fixed mindset as signs that your fixed talents or abilities are lacking. Or you can interpret them in a growth mindset as signs that you need to ramp up your strategies and effort, stretch yourself, and expand your abilities. It’s up to you.

So as you face challenges, setbacks, and criticism, listen to the fixed mindset voice and… talk back to it with a growth mindset voice.

As you approach a challenge:
THE FIXED-MINDSET says “Are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don’t have the talent.”
THE GROWTH-MINDSET answers, “I’m not sure I can do it now, but I think I can learn to with time and effort.”
FIXED MINDSET: “What if you fail—you’ll be a failure”
GROWTH MINDSET: “Most successful people had failures along the way.”
FIXED MINDSET: “If you don’t try, you can protect yourself and keep your dignity.”
GROWTH MINDSET: “If I don’t try, I automatically fail. Where’s the dignity in that?”

As you hit a setback:
FIXED MINDSET: “This would have been a snap if you really had talent.”
GROWTH MINDSET: “That is so wrong. Basketball wasn’t easy for Michael Jordan and science wasn’t easy for Thomas Edison. They had a passion and put in tons of effort.

As you face criticism:
FIXED MINDSET: “It’s not my fault. It was something or someone else’s fault.”
GROWTH MINDSET: “If I don’t take responsibility, I can’t fix it. Let me listen—however painful it is– and learn whatever I can.”

Step 3) Then…Take the growth mindset action.

Over time, which voice you head becomes pretty much your choice.
Whether you take on the challenge wholeheartedly, learn from your setbacks and try again,
Hearing the criticism and act on it is now in your hands.  Practice hearing both voices and practice acting on the growth mindset. See how you can make it work for you.

You can use a growth mindset in all aspects of your life.  So If you are ready to grow, get the book Mindsets by Carol Dweck.

Roller Coaster

by admin

Roller coaster exercise. One person is in front with their eyes closed (follower ). The other person has his hands on the person shoulders leading them through a crowd. The person leading will be weaving in and out of the rest of the people being lead. You start off slow working your way to a faster speed. (Do this a few times ask questions:
How did it feel being lead?
How did it feel leading?
What made you feel safe or out of control?

Then switch positions and repeat.

Next level when when you get used to this trust section you take it up a notch. Start off the same as step one but when the person who is being lead has no hands on their shoulders they stand still.  Another leader can then put their hands on their shoulders and start leading them. This is an exercise to figure out if you’re more comfortable as a leader or follower. When you’re done with your exercise ask more questions about:
How you felt being led?
How you felt as a leader?
Why?

This games gives insight on how people feel about being responsible for others or handing over full control.

 

How do you feel

How do you feel.

This is an 2 person at a time team building game.
This exercise is to help make a person more emotionally literate.
Emotional literacy is a great tool for a stronger more effective leader.

2 people sitting facing each other:
One person asked the question “How do you feel?”
They sit attentively listening to the other person without any interruptions.
There are 4 main questions to this,
The second person in one minute answers the following for questions
I feel physically. In general I feel. In a relationship I feel. Right now in this moment I feel.
Use positive and negative emotions other than happy and sad, try to be more specific and in touch with your feelings.

Here are some emotions.

Acceptance
Affection
Aggression
Ambivalence
Apathy
Anxiety
Boredom
Compassion
Confusion
Sympathy
Contempt
Depression
Doubt
Ecstasy
Empathy
Envy
Embarrassment
Euphoria
Forgiveness
Suffering
Frustration
Gratitude
Grief
Guilt
Hatred
Hope
Horror
Hostility
Homesickness
Hunger
Hysteria
Interest
Loneliness
Love
Paranoia
Pity
Pleasure
Pride
Rage
Regret
Remorse
Shame